Beauty in the Books: Treasures of the Toppan Library

Nestled between the Laramie Mountains to the east and the Snowy Range mountains to the west, Laramie is a gateway for visitors and residents alike to explore the beauty of Wyoming’s nature. Yet at the University of Wyoming’s American Heritage Center, there is another type of beauty waiting to be explored; the beauty of rare books from the past.  

The Common Book of Prayer and the Administrations of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church, According to the use of the Church of England, Together with the Psalter, or Psalms of David, Pointed as they are to be Sung or Said in Churches (Common Book Prayer for short) is one of the many rare books housed in the Toppan Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center. For most Anglican Churches in the British Commonwealth the Common Book of Prayers has been the standard liturgical text since 1662[1]. The copy housed in the library was published in 1678 by printers Christopher Barker and John Bill of London and was acquired in 2014.

Book of Prayer Visible Fore-Edge protective box
Custom protective box for Book of Common Prayer. Toppan Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming

 The age of this copy and its remarkable condition are indeed rare, however, it is the workmanship of the bookbinder that qualifies this book as a treasure. Early books were printed and remained unbound or in their original boards until the purchaser of the book sent it to a bookbinder for binding. Known for his beautiful leather tooling and fore-edge painting this bookbinder, whose name has been lost to time and is known as Queen’s Binder B, and their craftsmanship has transformed the book from a mere series of text into a beautiful work of art. The cover is bound in black Moroccan leather with intricate floral tooling stamped in gilt and painted silver. 

close up of Queen's Binder B
Queen’s Binder B – the cover is bound in black Moroccan leather with intricate floral tooling stamped in gilt and painted silver. Toppan Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

All the fore-edges are gilded, painted with colored flowers, and gauffered, indenting the gilded edges with a heated tool. Visitors to the American Heritage Center Main Reading Room (4th floor) can view this beautiful book by appointment.    

  • fore edge of Queen's Binder B book
  • bottom/tail-edge of Queen's Binder B book

Other books at the University did not arrive in such pristine shape. Found in the University of Wyoming Botany Department’s library in 2014, The British Herbal: an History of Plants and Tree, Natives of Britain, cultivated for Use or raised for Beauty (British Herbal) was sent for conservation work before it was transferred to the American Heritage Center Toppan Library. The spine binding was taped with pressure tape that caused a black residue to form on the split suede, the front cover or board was detached, and some of the pages were pulling away from the binding.

  • The British Herbal book spine before restoration work.
  • The British Herbal book spine after restoration work.
  • The British Herbal book spine with black residue on spine
  • inside look to The British Herbal: an History of Plants and Tree, Natives of Britain, cultivated for Use or raised for Beauty (British Herbal)
  • Inside look of The British Herbal: an History of Plants and Tree, Natives of Britain, cultivated for Use or raised for Beauty book

Written in 1757 by John Hill, the British Herbal was not well received at the time. A partial explanation may be attributed to Hill himself. An apothecary, botanist, writer and part-time actor, Hill, who often referred to himself as Sir John Hill, was not well regarded with his contemporaries of the time. Hill was often referred to as “only a little paltry dunghill.”[2] It appears that Hill not only took such criticism well but relished in the fame that it brought him and his books.

While Hill and his books may not have been appreciated during his day, visitors to the American Heritage Center can experience the beauty of the British Herbal. The split suede cover protects the large volume describing the types of plants and their characteristic. Along with the detailed copper engraving of plants, the British Herbal also has beautiful copper engravings on the title pages.

  • cover of The British Herbal: an History of Plants and Tree, Natives of Britain, cultivated for Use or raised for Beauty (British Herbal) book
  • close up of cover page of The British Herbal: an History of Plants and Tree, Natives of Britain, cultivated for Use or raised for Beauty (British Herbal) book
  • close up of cover page of The British Herbal: an History of Plants and Tree, Natives of Britain, cultivated for Use or raised for Beauty (British Herbal) book

John Hill’s British Herbal and the path it took show why it is such valued treasure. Whether you are visiting Laramie, or you call Laramie home, please remember the beautiful rare book treasures that are waiting for you to experience at the University of Wyoming’s American Heritage Center. Access to rare book holdings is via the Reference Services unit. Please contact us 307-766-3756, ahcref@uwyo.edu, for assistance.


[1] Book of Common Prayer, Encyclopedia Britannica, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Book-of-Common-Prayer

[2] p. 495. Stearn, William T. and John Hill, “Hill’s The British Herbal (1756-1757), Taxon, Vol. 16, No. 6 (Dec., 1967), pp. 494-498.


Blog contribution by Steve Yeager, former employee, Reference Services

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Putting Buddy Ebsen on the Camera Stand

Photo Assistant Amanda Wells photographing a Buddy Ebsen artifact
Photo Assistant Amanda Wells photographing a Buddy Ebsen artifact. American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

The AHC is primarily a research institution, meaning that a major focus of our collecting process is making collection material accessible to our patrons by processing and digitizing it. Digitization of archival material is important to making our collections searchable online, and can also be used to document fragile collection material as early as possible before further deterioration occurs. To address the digitization of formats beyond our Digital Scan Lab’s capabilities (such as, oversized documents and three-dimensional artifacts), we have a Digital Imaging Lab which is equipped with an overhead camera stand, studio equipment, high-resolution DSLR cameras, and a trained photographer. In the Digital Imaging Lab, one of my recent projects has been to document the wide variety of artifacts within the Buddy Ebsen collection as it’s being processed.

Content Lister Marina Brown with Ebsen material
Content Lister Marina Brown with Ebsen material. American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

This collection contains many artifacts from Ebsen’s life and work as a prolific actor, including props from the set of The Beverly Hillbillies. Some of the artifacts are fragile, so it takes a lot of care to handle them, and I’ve had to do research on some artifacts (such as the oil can musical instrument) to determine how to properly assemble the pieces.

Oil can musical instrument from The Beverly Hillbillies. American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

When an artifact crosses my camera stand, it takes time to find the proper lighting positions and manual camera settings. The archival standard allows for no post-processing besides cropping, so in addition to balancing exposure, shutter speed (to eliminate blurriness), aperture (to maximize the depth of focus), light sensitivity (to prevent graininess), and preventing camera shake, I also have to find the best angle to photograph from to reduce any reflections and maximize the informational content of the image. It can take a lot of work, but it’s important that I get it right so that we can provide the best possible documentation of the artifact for our patrons and our records.


Blog contribution by Hanna Fox, Photographer Digital Imaging Lab

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Posted in Digital collections, Hollywood history, Motion picture actors and actresses, motion picture history, newly cataloged collections, newly digitized collections, newly processed collections, television history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Finding Aids: February 2020

More collections have been archived and processed, so here’s another round of finding aids we’ve published so you can see what’s been added to our collections.

As a reminder, Finding Aids act as a table of contents for our collections. These aids help you find information about specific collections we have, and the information contained in the collections. We create these aids so it’s easier for researchers to figure out if collection is relevant to their work.

The strengths of our collections include Wyoming and the American West, politics and public policy, ranching and energy, entertainment and popular culture, industry, transportation, and military history. The documents and archives we hold serve as raw data for scholarship and heritage work, and support thriving communities of place, identity, and interest in Wyoming and beyond.

hallway of archival materials and shelving

Finding Aid Updates (from processed collections completed in January 2020)


H. Norman Snively. Snively was a petroleum geologist and geological consultant who worked for Standard Oil Company of California from 1916-1917, exploring the Ranglely Field in Colorado and the Lance Creek Field in Wyoming. In 1918 he worked in the Lost Soldier, Wyoming, District for General Petroleum Corporation. He was the regional geologist for Union Oil Company from 1920-1921, working in Montana and Wyoming. Later he worked as an independent consultant in Wyoming, Montana, and other areas of the United States and Canada. Snively’s papers contain correspondence (1913-1959), diaries (1908-1918), and geological maps and reports on various oil fields in California and the Rocky Mountain states. 

University of Wyoming College of Business. The School of Commerce, now known as the College of Business, was created in 1887. From 1900 to 1909, the school was known as the Wyoming State School of Commerce. In 1917 it became a division of the College of Liberal Arts. In 1947 the division became the College of Commerce and Industry, including the accounting, business administration, secretarial sciences, and statistics departments. The name was changed to the College of Business in 1991. The collection consists of general correspondence, bank journals, ledgers, project surveys, scrapbooks, and history about the College’s activities, management, and programs. It also contains documents related to the Air Force Institute of Technology Minuteman Education Program that offered an MBA at Francis E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, from the 1960s to the 1980s.

Wyoming State Bar. The Wyoming State Bar was organized in 1915 as a voluntary association and was integrated by the state legislature in 1939. It was established under the authority of the Wyoming Supreme Court to assist in the regulation and improvement of the profession. Its formally stated purpose is to assist and require attorneys to have high standards of integrity, competence, public service and conduct in order to promote the effective administration of justice. The records contain minutes from the Bar’s annual meetings, disciplinary files, membership lists, and various committees formed to address legal issues. Correspondence contains letters and memos from the Bar to its members and other legal organizations.


These and other AHC collections can be discovered in the University of Wyoming Libraries catalog. We are open for walk-in research on Mondays 10 am – 7 pm and Tuesdays through Fridays 8 am – 5 pm. For distance research assistance please contact our reference department at ahcref@uwyo.edu or 307-766-3756.

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Posted in Digital collections, Economic Geology, energy resources, Finding Aids, newly digitized collections, newly processed collections, University of Wyoming, University of Wyoming history, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Archives Rewind Vol. 9

It’s been a while since we’ve highlighted some of our “Archives on the Air” programs. So here’s a brand new Archives Rewind for the new year!

Episode 159: James L. Ehernberger Western Railroad Collection

Railroads have had a vital impact on Wyoming’s commerce and culture. Ehernberger collected railroad records and related historical material documenting railroad history in the West — particularly for Wyoming and the Rocky Mountain region.

train plowing through snow in Laramie, Wyoming in 1896
Snow being cleared from the Laramie Union Pacific Railroad Yard, Laramie, 1896. Box 2, Elmer F. Lovejoy papers.

Episode 156: Greetings From Gebo!—Mileva Maravic Papers

Gebo, Wyoming was a town owned and operated by the Owl Creek Coal Company. The coal company owned all the houses and business and didn’t charge rent.

Gebo penant - yellow and red in color
“Gebo” penant, undated. Box 1, Mileva Maravic papers.

Episode 149: The Nervous Wreck—Al Christie Papers

Al Christie built one one of the first permanent film studios in Hollywood — and they made three short films a week.

man in cowboy outfit in kitchen jumping
A scene from the silent film, “The Nervous Wreck”, 1926. Box 10, Al Christie papers.

Episode 141: Batman Hate Mail—William Dozier Papers

There are many iterations of Batman — Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer, George Clooney, Ben Affleck, and Christian Bale — and everyone has an opinion about who was best and worst.

But even the campy Adam West version of Batman got hate mail back in the day.

Batman joke book by Leonard Goldstein
It’s Fun To Be a Batman! Joke book, circa 1965. Box 1, William Dozier papers.

The purpose of the Archives Rewind series is to highlight episodes from our “Archives on the Air” segment that airs on Wyoming Public Media.

“Archives on the Air” can be heard on Wyoming Public Radio Monday through Friday at 11:50 am, and 6:50 pm or online on Wyoming Public Media’s website.

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Posted in Archives on the Air, Comic book history, Hollywood history, Motion picture actors and actresses, motion picture history, Western history, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Finding Aids: January 2020

We’re still busy as ever archiving and processing collections. Here’s another round of finding aides we’ve published so you can see what’s been added to our collections.

As a reminder, Finding Aids act as a table of contents for our collections. These aids help you find information about specific collections we have, and the information contained in the collections. We create these aids so it’s easier for researchers to figure out if collection is relevant to their work.

The strengths of our collections include Wyoming and the American West, politics and public policy, ranching and energy, entertainment and popular culture, industry, transportation, and military history. The documents and archives we hold serve as raw data for scholarship and heritage work, and support thriving communities of place, identity, and interest in Wyoming and beyond.

behind the scenes look at the archive at the American Heritage Center

Finding Aid Updates (from collections processed 10/11/19 – 11/1/19)


Comedian Eddie Lawrence. Lawrence was a character actor who wrote the Broadway musical “Kelly.”

Joan Bassett papers about 111 Grand Avenue. This building in Laramie housed both businesses and residences from 1920 to 1990.

Author Samuel Western. Western wrote “Pushed Off the Mountain, Sold Down the River,” an economic history of Wyoming.

Author Ron Franscell. After a career as a journalist, Wyoming native Franscell began writing crime fiction.

University of Wyoming Plant Science Division research and extension materials. These photographs document early agronomy and extension work of the university throughout the state.

The former University of Wyoming Chicano Studies Program. The collection contains a videotape called “Laramie Hoy” (Laramie Today) from 2000.

The University of Wyoming Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees was formed in 1886, before the university opened.

Lyle and Florence Brothers. Collection contains an assortment of political literature, including, anti-communist, racist, and anti-Semitic materials.

Wyoming History Day records. The History Day program for middle and high school students encouraged discovery and interpretation of historical topics.

Elder Family Financial Exploitation research. The collection contains de-identified interviews regarding elder financial abuse.

Arts & Sciences Dean Oliver Walter. Walter was Dean of the A&S College from 1989 to 2012.

City councilman Charles P. Beall. Beall was active in Albany County, Wyoming, politics in the 1950s.

The American Heritage Center (AHC) has digitized and made accessible online 700 negatives from the Bob Kisken photographs collection #11383.

Bob Kisken was a resident of Glenrock, Wyoming. After retiring, he took up ranch and farm photography as a hobby.

Collection contains more than 1000 color, black and white, and sepia photographs and negatives taken by Kisken of cattle branding, rodeos, sales barns, and cattle operations in Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming. Also included are a series of images of women in agriculture and ranching. The digitized items and additional information about the Bob Kisken photographs #11383 can be found in the online finding aid.


These and other AHC collections can be discovered in the University of Wyoming Libraries catalog. We are open for walk-in research on Mondays 10 am – 7 pm and Tuesdays through Fridays 8 am – 5 pm. For distance research assistance please contact our reference department at ahcref@uwyo.edu or 307-766-3756.

#AlwaysArchiving

Posted in Finding Aids, Laramie, Local history, Motion picture actors and actresses, newly digitized collections, newly processed collections, University of Wyoming, University of Wyoming history, Western history, western politics and leadership, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Samuel H. Knight and Man’s Best Friend

Dogs are one of life’s greatest treasures. They love their owners unconditionally, enjoy walks, belly rubs, and appreciate any moment that they spend with their owner. For centuries, people have had great admiration for dogs and enjoy capturing their essence through several different types of media such as paintings, sculptures, and especially photography. Over the years, photography has become a rather popular way of capturing pictures of beloved pets. One can go on any social media site and see picture after picture of dogs, cats, and all sorts of pets. Samuel H. Knight had a passion for photography and because of this, people today are able to get a glimpse into his life and are able to see that Knight himself was a dog lover and enjoyed taking pictures of dogs.

Knight was somewhat fond of taking photos of his family’s pets.  A majority of the photographs that contain a dog are that of Knight’s family. One of his family dogs was a particularly fluffy and calm dog named Trixie.

dog sitting in grass
Trixie. University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center, Samuel H. Knight Collection, Accession Number 400044, Box 103

In most of the pictures that include her, she is surrounded by Knight’s children and does not look as though she is bothered by their presence. The negatives depict Knight’s children holding Trixie in their laps or petting her on a porch, all the while Trixie is smiling and appearing happy and content. With children, pets can sometimes become annoyed with the lack of personal space but from the images we have in our collections, Trixie did not seem like the type of dog to get annoyed with children too easily.

  • two children and a dog sitting on a porch outside.
  • dog and people sitting on the ground outside posing for photo.

Another one of Knight’s family dogs is a fluffy terrier who is full of energy. Every picture of him makes it appear as though this dog rarely stayed still. In some of the photos, the dog is wearing a harness with an incredibly taut leash. A taut leash would indicate an energetic and curious canine, and multiple other images that include the family dog reinforce that idea.

a girl sitting on a couch with her puppy dog
Family dog. University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center, Samuel H. Knight Collection, Accession Number 400044, Box 119,

A Christmas picture with the Knight family was ruined after they decided to include the family dog in the picture. The family dog, being as energetic as he was, was unable to stay still during the duration of the photo-taking process. The final image was a nice and clear family picture that included a blurry spot that was the dog.

Squirming Family Dog. University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center, Samuel H. Knight Collection, Accession Number 400044, Box 119

Finally, Knight was known to take pictures of dogs that were not even his. A good example of this is a dog that appears to be guarding the very first grindstone in Rawlins, Wyoming. This big, solemn dog has no real purpose being in the photo capturing Rawlins’s accomplishment yet Knight still decided to leave him in, which indicates Knight’s appreciation for dogs.

Dog with grindstone. University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center, Samuel H. Knight Collection, Accession Number 400044, Box 93, Negative D3-3262 & C-41523

Here’s another example of Knight’s appreciation for dogs. This dog looks similar to a mix between a lab and a boxer and is leashed to a post outside. He does not look particularly amused to be having his picture taken but still stays stationary as he was getting his picture taken nonetheless. There is nothing surrounding the dog that indicates Knight was attempting to capture anything other than the dog. It is safe to say that by leaving a random dog in the picture or taking a picture solely of a dog, it shows that Knight does enjoy dogs and would do what he could to take pictures of them.

a dog standing outside in the grass
University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center, Samuel H. Knight Collection, Accession Number 400044, Box 82, Negative B1-2125

 Not only has Samuel H. Knight given people of today the ability to get a glimpse into his daily life, but he also gave them the ability to understand the life of a dog during the early 1900s. Trixie was a fluffy and calm dog who worked well with children, the other family dog was not as well trained as Trixie but was also incredibly energetic and always kept his leash taut when he went on walks. Other dogs, who were not owned by Knight, also had their pictures taken. Knight showed people his love and appreciation for dogs through the use of photography while also giving the future the ability to understand the past.


Blog contribution by: Maiah T. Porter, Carlson Endowment Student Intern

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Votes for Women – The 1920 Ratification Campaign

Grace Raymond Hebard and Carrie Chapman Catt

Ribbon: “Votes for Women.” American Heritage Center, Box 77, Grace Raymond Hebard papers.

On June 4, 1919, the Senate passed the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution. The amendment stated: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.” The action of Congress, however, did not enfranchise a single female. Thirty-six states had to ratify the amendment before it could go into force.

The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), led by Carrie Chapman Catt, had much work to do to convince the necessary number of state legislators to give their support. NAWSA embarked on an intensive state by state campaign to convince generally all-male legislatures to admit a massive new number of voters to the rolls. Fifteen states had already given their women full voting rights. Catt reached out to women in those places asking them to share their experiences. Among those who answered Catt’s call was Dr. Grace Raymond Hebard of Wyoming.

Grace Raymond Hebard posing for a photo circa 1920
Photograph: Grace Raymond Hebard, about 1920. American Heritage Center, Photo Biographical Files, Hebard, Grace Raymond.

Grace Hebard was born in 1861 in Clinton, Iowa. She received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Iowa in 1882 and moved to Cheyenne, Wyoming, to work as a draftsman and surveyor in the United States Land Office. This was an unusual position for a woman, but it did not satisfy Hebard’s ambition. She went on to earn a Master’s degree in 1885 and a Ph.D. in 1893. She was appointed to the University of Wyoming’s Board of Trustees in 1891 and became a member of the Wyoming Bar Association in 1898. She was University Librarian and head of the University’s Political Economy Department by 1908. Still underemployed, she found time to support American troops in World War I and work with foreign-born residents seeking citizenship. Always an active advocate for women, in 1920 she was tapped by Carrie Chapman Catt. Catt’s telegram of April 12 was explicit: “To get thirty sixth state mobilizing one woman each state[.] Want you Wyoming…Want you and you only.”[1]

Telegram: Carrie Chapman Catt to Grace Raymond Hebard requesting help in securing passage of the 19th amendment, April 12, 1920.
Telegram: Carrie Chapman Catt to Grace Raymond Hebard requesting help in securing passage of the 19th amendment, April 12, 1920. American Heritage Center, Box 21, Folder 6, Grace Raymond Hebard papers.

Catt wanted these women to persuade the governor of Connecticut to call a special session of the legislature to ratify women’s suffrage. Many states had already dismissed their legislative sessions and did not plan to call another one until 1921. But that would occur after the presidential election of 1920 and would deny women the chance to participate in the national elections for another four years. Catt summoned her forces and distributed her talking points. The women were instructed to point out the political consequences of delay. “Parties must make no mistake as to depth of women’s feeling…In Connecticut, it is the Republican [P]arty that will be held responsible.”[2]

Hebard had some strategies of her own. In New York, on her way to Connecticut, she attracted the attention of the press: “Dr. Grace Hebbard [sic], [3] of Laramie, Wyo., paid no attention to the skyscrapers when she arrived for the first time on Broadway last night…The first thing which stimulated her curiosity in New York was the headquarters of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage. ‘I never saw an anti-suffragist,’ she said last night at the Hotel McAlpin,…’You know out in Wyoming we have had woman suffrage for fifty years and there is no such thing as an anti-suffrage man in our state – much less a woman…I want to go around there and see what those women are like. I cannot imagine what they have to say for their point of view.’”

The Connecticut suffragists and their guests toured the state, then had a hearing before the governor and held a public rally on May 7. Nevertheless, Governor Marcus H. Holcomb refused to call the special session. Then in August, Tennessee became the thirty-sixth state to ratify the 19th amendment, and the question of whether women would vote in the 1920 elections was settled. Suddenly Catt’s threat had teeth. The new voters had the power to punish obstructionists. Holcomb reversed course and called a special session for September. Connecticut ratified on September 21, 1920, in time to avoid backlash in the November elections.[4]

  • letter from Ruth McIntire Dadourian to Grace Raymond Hebard giving instructions for speakers in Connecticut
  • Speaking Points document: ideas for speakers at the governor’s hearing and rally in Connecticut.

Ironically, Wyoming had followed a similar path. The collaboration between Hebard and Catt had been established when Catt came to Wyoming in November 1919 to help persuade Governor Robert D. Carey to call a special legislative session to make Wyoming the first state to ratify the 19th amendment. Carey refused. Wyoming had never had a special session, special sessions were expensive, Wyoming’s women already had the right to vote, so there was no need to burden legislators with a long trip in winter. Catt, Hebard, and the twenty-five other women of the Wyoming Ratification Committee were turned away. But Carey, too, changed his mind and summoned his legislators out in January of 1920 because “the opponents of suffrage have been using as an argument against granting equal rights to women that Wyoming had not ratified for the reason that suffrage had proved a failure in this State…[W]e could not allow such a charge to be unchallenged.” Wyoming became the 27th state to ratify on January 28th.[5]

Grace Raymond Hebard and Carrie Chapman Catt, and several other women posing for a photo outside. Probably taken in 1921 when Catt was in Laramie to accept an honorary doctorate from the University of Wyoming.
Photograph: Grace Raymond Hebard and Carrie Chapman Catt, probably taken in 1921 when Catt was in Laramie to accept an honorary doctorate from the University of Wyoming.

Catt’s friendship with Hebard and her association with Wyoming did not end there. In 1921 the University of Wyoming conferred its first honorary doctorate degree. The honoree chosen was Carrie Chapman Catt. “We all know,” wrote Ida Husted Harper of NAWSA’s Bureau of Suffrage Education to Grace Raymond Hebard, “that you were back of the idea of conferring the doctor’s degree on Mrs. Catt  and we think it was one of the best things you ever did, and you have done so many.”[6]


[1] Telegram, Carrie Chapman Catt to Grace Raymond Hebard, April 12, 1920, Box 21, Folder 6, Grace Raymond Hebard papers, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming
[2] “Speaking Points,” undated typescript, Box 21, Folder 6, Hebard papers
[3] “Advance Guard of Suffrage Emergency Corps Arrives,” clipping from New York Tribune, May 2, 1920, Box 21, Folder 6, Hebard papers
[4] Press release by National American Woman Suffrage Association, April 22, 1920, Box 21, Folder 7, Hebard papers; Letter, Ruth McIntire Dadourian to Grace Raymond Hebard, May 4, 1920, Box 21, Folder 6, Hebard papers; “The Long Road to Women’s Suffrage in Connecticut,” Connecticut Explored, https://www.ctexplored.org/the-long-road-to-womens-suffrage-in-connecticut/
[5] “Ratification of National Woman Suffrage Amendment…Governor Carey’s Message,” typescript, Box 21, Folder 6, Hebard papers; “Wyoming Ratifies the 19th Amendment,” WyoHistory.org  https://www.wyohistory.org/encyclopedia/wyoming-ratifies-19th-amendment
[6] University of Wyoming, Past Honorary Degree Recipients, http://www.uwyo.edu/honorarydegree/past_honorary_degree_recepients/;  letter, Ida Husted Harper to Grace Raymond Hebard, Dec. 23, 1921, Box 32, Folder 29, Hebard papers


Blog contribution by D. Claudia Thompson, Processing Manager, American Heritage Center

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Posted in Local history, Politics, Suffrage -- United States, University of Wyoming, University of Wyoming history, Western history, western politics and leadership, Women -- suffrage, women's history, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

E. Deane Hunton and Steamboat

E. Deane Hunton was born in Virginia in 1885. When he was three years old his family moved out around Wheatland, Wyoming.

E. Deane Hunton attended the University of Wyoming where he obtained a degree in mining engineering. During his time here, Hunton lettered in four varsity sports: baseball, basketball, football, and track. He also was a member of the Alpha Kappa Psi, a national commerce fraternity. Along with these accomplishments, E. Deane Hunton received an MBA degree from Harvard University. Hunton worked for the war trade board during the last two years of World War I in Washington D.C. In 1922-1923, he traveled overseas to Europe for a yearlong sabbatical.

  • newspaper article
  • photo of men's basketball team

Amongst these many achievements, one stands out as having the longest legacy; Hunton was the creator of the University of Wyoming’s infamous Steamboat logo. In 1909, Hunton found a picture of the cowboy, Guy Holt, riding the bucking horse, Steamboat. Hunton quickly sketched it out and sent it in to the baseball team to use on their uniforms. When he became the faculty manager for the University of Wyoming athletics, he implemented the design onto all the athletic uniforms. The University of Wyoming now oversees the trademark for this logo for both the school and the state.

  • man riding a bucking bronc in the middle of a field
  • Cowboy Homecoming nametag

Additionally, the 1937 Wyoming license plates used the Steamboat logo and University of Wyoming colors by suggestion of E. Deane Hunton. These licenses plates commemorated the University of Wyoming’s 50th anniversary.

newpaper article
Newspaper clipping of the article run in The Branding Iron about Hunton’s achievement of getting the University colors and Steamboat onto the 1937 license plates. E. Deane Hunton Collection, Accession Number 400069, Box 6, Book 12, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

The visual materials in this collection cover everything in E. Deane Hunton’s personal and professional life from all around the world. It is at the American Heritage Center under the collection title, E. Deane Hunton Collection, or the collection number, 400069. Contact the American Heritage Center if you would like to learn more about this fascinating man!


Blog contribution by: Anne-Marie Stratton , Carlson Endowment Student Intern

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Posted in Local history, Sports and Recreation, University of Wyoming, University of Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Legacy of Zdeněk Salzmann for the Arapaho (Hinónoʼeiteen)[1]

November is Native American Heritage month. The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) refers to it as a “month to celebrate rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and histories and to acknowledge the important contributions of Native People.” [2] That celebration started in 1990, when George H. W. Bush “approved a joint resolution designating November [as] Native American Heritage Month.”[3]

Zdeněk Salzmann, an anthropological linguist, traveled to the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming, to research the Arapaho language and culture.  His project, which was part of his PhD thesis, started in 1949, but continued in the 1950s, 1960s and later in the 1980s, when this time he was acting as principal investigator for the “Arapaho Cultural Heritage Reinforcement project” with the University of Massachusetts.

His work involved interviews with the elders that were fluent in Arapaho, inquiring about their customs, but also researching the vocabulary, verbs, songs, tales and folklore, also creating an English-Arapaho dictionary out of index cards.  In 1963, he published his thesis, “A Sketch of Arapaho Grammar”.

Arapaho translated songs
Translated songs, Box 15, Zdeněk Salzmann Arapaho Indian research papers, Collection #10396, American Heritage Center, University of Wymoing.
translation of body parts from Arapaho to English
Body parts, Box 15, Zdeněk Salzmann Arapaho Indian research papers, Collection #10396, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

For the Wind River Indian Reservation tribe, the preservation of their culture is becoming increasingly important. Only a few dozen amongst the elders speak it fluently. The use of the language was put aside in schools when the missionaries settled on the reservation in the late 1800s until the late 1930’s. Only English was allowed to be spoken in the classroom of the St. Stephens Indian Boarding School.[4]

In 2010, UNESCO listed the language as severely endangered, but efforts to bring back the daily use of the Arapaho Language, started in 2000, when the Tribe got a chance to partner with a linguistics professor from the University of Colorado Boulder.  Andrew Cowell used the research material created by Salzmann, and over the years, it led to the creation of a dictionary, edited three times, and was produced using the index cards that Zdeněk Salzmann created. Andrew Cowell’s project also includes an outreach website which can serve as an educational tool, about the Arapaho language and culture.

Arapaho language dictionary cards
Letter “A”, dictionary cards, Box 18, Zdeněk Salzmann Arapaho Indian research papers, Coll. #10396, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

The Arapaho Language Project[5] is ongoing, and the Arapaho Tribe on the Wind River Indian Reservation, benefits from tools such as websites, phone apps and video tutorials used by the students in the classrooms.[6] 

To learn more about the Arapaho language and culture, see the Zdeněk Salzmann Arapaho Indian research papers at the American Heritage Center. Part of the collection is also available digitally.


[1] https://verbs.colorado.edu/arapaho/public/view_search
[2] http://www.ncai.org/initiatives/native-american-heritage-month
[3] https://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/about/
[4] Meyers, Micalea. “Revitalizing the Arapaho Language.UWyo: The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of the University of Wyoming, vol. 21, no. 1, 2019, pp. 24-28.
[5] https://www.colorado.edu/p13d6ec61edd/
[6] Simpson, Kevin. “To Save Their Dying Language, the Arapaho turn to High-tech Apps, Old-school Flash Cards and a New Generation.” Denver Post, 23 April 2017, Accessed 23 October 2019.


Blog contribution by: Alexandra Cardin, Archival Processor at the AHC

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Posted in American Indian history, Wind River Reservation, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Finding Aids: November 2019

We’ve had a productive fall (read: winter) processing even more collections over the past few months. Here’s another round of finding aids we’ve published so you can see what we’ve been up to.

As a reminder, Finding Aids act as a table of contents for our collections. These aids help you find information about specific collections we have, and the information contained in the collections. We create these aids so it’s easier for researchers to figure out if collection is relevant to their work.

The strengths of our collections include Wyoming and the American West, politics and public policy, ranching and energy, entertainment and popular culture, industry, transportation, and military history. The documents and archives we hold serve as raw data for scholarship and heritage work, and support thriving communities of place, identity, and interest in Wyoming and beyond.

hallway of archival materials and shelving

Finding Aid Updates (from collections processed 7/11/19 – 10/10/19)


Petroleum developer J.H. Rowe. Rowe was a Montana businessman who developed oil fields in the early 1900s.

Oil investor Charles F. Moon. Moon invested in Victor Ziegler’s Bonanza Oil Company which drilled successfully in Wyoming in the 1950s.

City engineer W.E. Zipfel. Zipfel worked in Laramie’s Chief Engineer’s office platting railroad and telephone lines.

Oil executive William L. Connelly. Connelly headed a Sinclair oil subsidiary in Wyoming at the time of the Teapot Dome Scandal.

Photojournalist Phil Brodatz. Brodatz won top honors for his photographs at the 1964 World’s Fair, and his images appeared on UNICEF Christmas cards.

NASA scientist and psychologist Richard F. Haines. Haines documented and studied UFO sightings.

Actor and writer Joseph Julian. Julian worked with Norman Corwin and Orson Welles before being blacklisted in the 1950s.

Laramie business Knight Oil Company. The Knight family operated a garage, car dealership, and oil company.

Continental Oil Company materials. Included are reports from Rocky Mountain oilfields in the 1920s.

Laramie pharmacist Charles Settele. Settele’s pharmacy operated for 17 years and was known throughout Wyoming.

The AHC has digitized and made accessible online 4340 negatives from the Ludwig & Svenson Studio photographs collection #00167.

Ludwig & Svenson Studio was a family owned photography studio in Laramie, Wyoming during the twentieth century. Originally named Svenson Photography, the studio was established by Henning Svenson in 1905. In 1943, Svenson Photography was purchased by Walter B. Ludwig, who renamed it Ludwig & Svenson Studio. The business was later renamed Ludwig Photography. The company mainly served a local clientele and was also known for its photographs of Laramie and its scenic photographs of Wyoming.

The collection contains negatives, interpositives, and prints of Laramie, Wyoming residents, Laramie public school students, and University of Wyoming groups, students, and other affiliates; photographs of Laramie architecture including the University of Wyoming, businesses, and houses; and Wyoming scenes including Sand Creek and King Brothers Ranch, images of organizations and groups within Laramie, and events in Laramie and at the University of Wyoming.


These and other AHC collections can be discovered in the University of Wyoming Libraries catalog. We are open for walk-in research on Mondays 10 am – 7 pm and Tuesdays through Fridays 8 am – 5 pm. For distance research assistance please contact our reference department at ahcref@uwyo.edu or 307-766-3756.

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Posted in Digital collections, energy resources, Finding Aids, Hollywood history, Laramie, Local history, Motion picture actors and actresses, motion picture history, Natural resources, newly cataloged collections, newly processed collections, resources, Teapot Dome scandal | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment