A Friendship Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick and Gerald Fried

Gerald Fried, a Julliard trained composer for television and film and a still active nonagenarian, began performing music in his Bronx neighborhood during the 1940s. There he met Stanley Kubrick, who would go on to become a celebrated film director, screenwriter, and producer.

Kubrick and Fried attended the same high school and became friends when Kubrick asked to join the same baseball club as Fried’s.[1]

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Baseball Club, “The Barracudas, Gerald Fried at lower right, 1941. Gerald Fried papers, Accession #2883, Box 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

When they met, Fried’s passion was music and Kubrick’s was photography. A few years later, in 1951, Kubrick made a short film documentary about boxer Walter Cartier, whom he had photographed and written about for Look magazine a year earlier. Kubrick rented a camera and produced a 16-minute black-and-white documentary titled Day of the Fight.[2]  Fried recalled with a laugh that Kubrick asked him to do the music because “I was the only musician he knew”.[3]

Gerald Fried went on to score four other Kubrick movies: Fear and Desire (1953); Killer’s Kiss (1955); The Killing (1956) and Paths of Glory (1957).

 

 

Movie stills Fear and Desire page 1 Box 35

Movie stills from Fear and Desire, undated. Gerald Fried papers, Accession #2883, Box 35, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

 

Movie Stills Fear and Desire page 2 Box 35

Movie stills from Fear and Desire, undated. Gerald Fried papers, Accession #2883, Box 35, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

Fear and Desire Score Box 35

Part of score from Fear and Desire, undated. Gerald Fried papers, Accession #2883, Box 35, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming. caption

Cinematic photo from The Killing 1956 Box 106

Cinematic photo from The Killing. Gerald Fried papers, Accession #2883, Box 106, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

While shooting these films, Kubrick still pursued his love of photography.

Gerald Fried photo Taken by Stanley Kubrick 1951 Box 1

Photo of Gerald Fried by Stanley Kubrick, ca. 1955. Gerald Fried papers, Accession #2883, Box 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

Although they did not work together after Paths of Glory, Fried and Kubrick remained in contact, writing to each other from time to time.

Letter from Kubrick 1981 box 1

Letter from Stanley Kubrick, 1981. Gerald Fried papers, Accession #2883, Box 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

Letter from Kubrick 1991 box 1

Letter from Stanley Kubrick, 1991. Gerald Fried papers, Accession #2883, Box 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

Stanley Kubrick is most remembered for the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which he co-wrote, directed and produced. This year we celebrate the film’s 50th anniversary. Coincidentally, Kubrick took inspiration from a project Gerald Fried worked on. For New York’s World Fair in 1964, Fried composed music for a Cinerama 360º film by Graphic Films, entitled, To the Moon and Beyond. Kubrick saw the film at the Fair and was so impressed by the special effects and accurate depiction of scientifically-based material that he hired Graphic Films as a design consultant for 2001: A Space Odyssey, which was then in pre-production.[4]

To the Moon and Beyond part of score Box 24

Part of score from “To the Moon and Beyond”, Box 24, Gerald Fried papers, Collection #2883,         American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

To learn more about Gerald Fried and his collaboration with Stanley Kubrick, see the Gerald Fried papers at the American Heritage Center.

[1] Robert Nott, “Sunday Spotlight: A 88, Hollywood Composer Gerald Fried Keeps the Songs Coming,” Santa Fe New Mexican, September 3, 2016. Accessed June 7, 2018: http://www.santafenewmexican.com/life/features/sunday-spotlight-at-hollywood-composer-gerald-fried-keeps-the-songs/article_303fffc6-7177-5768-bb37-5aeab7ba3c7b.html

[2] Wikipedia, Short films (1951-1953), s.v. “Stanley Kubrick,” last modified June 7, 2018, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Kubrick#Short_films_(1951%E2%80%931953)

[3] Nott, “Sunday Spotlight”.

[4] Wikipedia, Influences on 2001: A Space Odyssey, s.v. “To the Moon and Beyond,” last modified November 27, 2017,  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_the_Moon_and_Beyond#Influences_on_2001:_A_Space_Odyssey

– Submitted by Alexandra Cardin, AHC Processing Unit

Posted in Composers, found in the archive, motion picture history, music, popular culture, science fiction, Stanley Kubrick, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

“Archives on the Air” Debuts Monday, June 18

The American Heritage Center has been collaborating with Wyoming Public Media to create a new program to highlight aspects of the AHC’s collections using one-minute stories. Some stories are serious, some are fun, but all are intriguing!

Debut of the program, “Archives on the Air,” is Monday, June 18, on Wyoming Public Radio. You’ll have an opportunity three times a day to catch a story.

AHC Assistant Archivist Molly Marcusse is the voice behind the stories.

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AHC Assistant Archivist Molly Marcusse

We’ve been lucky to have story assistance from a stellar group of research assistants: Alex Vernon, London Homer-Wambeam, and Conor McCracken-Flesher.

Vernon

Alex Vernon

London

London Homer-Wambeam

Conor

Conor McCracken-Flesher

In addition to airing the stories, WPR will host them, with images, as podcasts on their website. We’ll let you know when that begins.

The AHC gives a big shout out to WPM’s Micah Schweitzer. He’s been our guiding light and our behind-the-scenes guy at WPM making this program a reality. Thanks Micah!

schweizer

Micah Schweizer

Tune in and let us know what you think of the stories you hear!

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Summer Exhibit Series: Businesses in Laramie

The summer exhibit series at the AHC continues to celebrate Laramie’s 150th anniversary with a new theme this week: Businesses in Laramie.

Within weeks of the railroad reaching Laramie, the former “Hell on Wheels” tent town became part of an ever growing and changing landscape as buildings began dotting the landscape. Many of these buildings would come to hold businesses marked by the names of some of Laramie’s most famous residents. These bright new businesses began Laramie’s movement away from its roots as a railroad town towards the business-friendly city it is today.

Many of the city’s most famous residents opened businesses in the current downtown area in the early days of Laramie. Some of these early businesses now only find their names in city records. Sometimes names of their owners are attached to new businesses that have grown out of the ever-changing Laramie landscape. For example, Lovejoy’s Bar and Grill is located at the site of Elmer Lovejoy’s Garage at 101 Grand Avenue.

Businesses like Lovejoy’s Garage, the W. H. Holliday Company, and Root’s Opera House no longer exist in town, but these businesses paved the way for new businesses that are found in Downtown Laramie. Elmer Lovejoy, William Holliday, and Helen Root were famous for their contributions to the city, and their legacy lives on at the AHC.

The AHC holds many collections from the owners of these early businesses, including those of Elmer Lovejoy, the Holliday Family, and Root’s Opera House. Over the next two weeks, the Elmer Lovejoy and Root’s Opera House collections will be highlighted in the exhibit series.

1924HomeApplianceDemo_HollidayFamily_#347_box42

Home appliance demonstration at W.H. Holliday Company, 1924. Holliday Family papers, Accession #347, Box 42, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming

Elmer Lovejoy was a Laramie businessman who ran a general repair shop, Lovejoy Novelty Works, while also being an inventor. He built and drove Laramie’s first steam-driven automobile in 1902. In 1905, he invented an automobile steering gear, and in 1918 and 1921 he patented designs for automatic garage door openers. Lovejoy also operated a dealership for Franklin automobiles. Lovejoy was active in the Laramie Bicycle Club and was an amateur photographer. His collection contains records books for the Laramie Cycling Club, motion picture film depicting University of Wyoming homecoming parades and commencements, records for his general repair shop, and patents for his automatic door openers.

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Elmer Lovejoy’s patent for automatic door opener, 1918. Elmer Lovejoy papers, Accession #176, Box 1, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming

 

Root’s Opera House was operated by Helen “Sissy” Root and her brother-in-law Chauncey Root. From 1894 to 1929, the opera house attracted the finest actors, repertory companies, and international singers who performed in popular plays, musical comedies, and concerts. It was the first established theater in Laramie.

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Roots Opera House exterior, 1927. Ludwig-Svenson Collection, Accession #167, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

The collection contains a scrapbook holding programs for theatrical shows performed at the opera house between 1906 and 1916. Within the scrapbook are also a few advertisements and tabloids promoting upcoming events.

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Interior display of playbills at Roots Opera House, March 1920. Ludwig-Svenson Collection, Accession #167, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming.

The Businesses in Laramie exhibit runs from June 11 to 25. Exhibits can be viewed in the 4th floor Reading Room. Reading Room hours are 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM on Monday and 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Tuesday through Friday. Closed Saturday and Sunday.

For more details about Laramie’s 150th anniversary celebration, see http://visitlaramie.org/laramie150. Celebratory events are planned all summer and into the fall.

Laramie's 150th

– Post submitted by Katey Parris, AHC Reference Department.

Posted in announcements, Current events, exhibits, found in the archive, Laramie 150th Anniversary, Local history, Uncategorized, Western history, Wyoming history | Tagged | Leave a comment

Glimpses into the Iron Ore Mining Past of Sunrise, Wyoming

AHC Archivist Ginny Kilander is presenting a talk June 8, 2018, titled “Glimpses into the Iron Ore Mining Past of Sunrise, Wyoming” at the Mining History Association Annual Conference that’s happening in Deadwood-Lead, South Dakota. Her talk is part of the session: “Communities, Corporations, and Mine Workers on the Western Plains”.

Ginny’s presentation features images from a newly acquired photo album the AHC purchased that offers a look at operations at the Sunrise Iron Ore Mine and the town of Sunrise, Wyoming, from 1899 to 1920.

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Sunrise, Wyoming, was a company mining town, founded in 1899 by the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company. By the early 1900s there were four room homes, a boarding house, school house, and a community building with a hall and reading room.

In the 1910s and 1920s, further improvements included a YMCA building, parks, a hospital, and a better utility system.

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The population of Sunrise, Wyoming reached more than 500 individuals by 1920 because of the Sunrise Iron Ore Mine that it was built around. The Sunrise Mine produced more than 40 million tons of iron ore, with peak production in 1941.

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For eighty years the mine was the key source of iron for the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company.

The mine closed in 1980 and Sunrise became another mining ghost town in Wyoming.

The Sunrise Mine Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2005.

Photos above are some of the many to be found in the Sunrise photo album.

 

 

Posted in Current events, Digital collections, Economic Geology, faculty/staff profiles, found in the archive, Local history, mining history, Uncategorized, Western history, Wyoming history | Tagged | Leave a comment

Hoppy’s Saddle is not Hoppy’s Saddle – The Mystery Solved

In 1982, Grace Bradley Boyd donated to the American Heritage Center a large cache of documents, photographs and memorabilia that belonged to her late husband William L. Boyd, or “Hopalong Cassidy” as he was better known.  “Hoppy” was well-known to children from the 1930s through the 50s as the quintessential good guy in the black hat who rode the range with his unflappable horse Topper, capturing villains without a shot fired.

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Grace and William Boyd in the living room of their California home, ca. 1950. William L. Boyd Papers, Accession Number 8038, Box 115, Folder 3, UW American Heritage Center.

Mrs. Boyd’s donation included the original saddle used by Hopalong Cassidy, or so the AHC thought. For many years the saddle was displayed as “Hopalong Cassidy’s Saddle”. However, questions arose about who, in fact, rode in that saddle. Using historic photographs taken of William and Grace Boyd while in character determined that the saddle actually belonged to Grace in her portrayal of “Mrs. Hopalong Cassidy”.

When the collection was donated by Mrs. Boyd, not all of the material was sent to the AHC. It was split between various museums that also collected western and popular culture materials. Two saddles were donated to two different museums, one to the American Heritage Center in Laramie, Wyoming, and the other to the Autry Museum of the American West in San Diego, California. These saddles were used by the TV characters “Hopalong Cassidy” and wife “Mrs. Hopalong Cassidy”.

William and Grace Boyd

William “Hopalong Cassidy” Boyd with wife Grace Bradley Boyd, 1942. Photo courtesy of Boyd Magers, Western Clippings, at http://www.westernclippings.com/treasures/westerntreasures_gallery_74.shtml.

While discussing the borrowing of collection material from the AHC’s William L. Boyd Collection to the Autry Museum a comment about the “Hoppy Saddle” came up. “There was a remark about the saddle not being Hoppy’s and instead the saddle belonging to Grace Boyd’s character.” says AHC Collections Manager Bill Hopkins. This thought stayed with him and while looking for projects that would enhance student workers’ time this remark came back to him.

Research began with a look through AHC collections to find out what information the AHC had on the saddle in the William L. Boyd collection. Historical photographs and a look through the Autry’s online collection database gave student worker Kelly Law a good starting point. The artifacts included in the AHC collection include two different sets of tack and several photographs of Boyd in character. “There is a definite connection between the reigns for the saddle that ‘Mrs. Hopalong Cassidy’ used and the saddle on display at the AHC. Since the AHC has two different sets of reigns associated with the William Boyd collection I looked for the one that would match the saddle,” says Law. She adds, “The historical photos also helped to see Mr. and Mrs. Hopalong Cassidy dressed as their characters and determine what matched the saddle on display.”  Law found that the different sizes of medallions compared to the photographs point to the saddle belonging to “Mrs. Hopalong Cassidy”.

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The saddle in question. UW American Heritage Center photo files.

While the original ownership of the saddle was never in doubt, the user of the saddle was up for debate. The AHC is now confident in identifying the saddle in their possession as the one that was used by “Mrs. Hopalong Cassidy”.

– Post submitted by Kelly Law, Accessioning Unit, American Heritage Center.

 

Posted in announcements, Collection donor, Current events, found in the archive, Hopalong Cassidy, Motion picture actors and actresses, motion picture history, popular culture, Student projects, television history, Uncategorized, Western history | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Summer Exhibit Series: Wyoming Territorial Prison

The summer exhibit series at the AHC celebrating Laramie’s 150th anniversary continues with a new theme this week: the Wyoming Territorial Prison.

As buildings sprung up in the former “Hell on Wheels” town, a new imposing stone structure shadowed the landscape. With construction starting in 1872, the Territorial Prison opened its doors to inmates in January 1873, while construction still continued.

This prison was one of few federal prisons at the time, and the only one in Wyoming. Soon-to-be-famous outlaw Butch Cassidy was incarcerated at the prison from 1894 to 1896. For more than a decade, the prison served as a federal prison, and upon Wyoming’s statehood, served as the Wyoming State Penitentiary until 1903.

Prisoners served out their sentences under a strict Auburn Prison System, which required convicts to be silent at all times, participate in gang work, leave cells only on command when going to work and other activities, wear black and white striped uniforms, replace names with numbers, and move about the prison in lock step.

Cell door

One of the cell doors at the Wyoming Territorial Prison, ca. 1910. B. C. Buffum Papers, Accession Number 400055, Box 23, UW American Heritage Center.

When the prison’s inmates were moved to the new State Penitentiary in Rawlins in 1903, the property was given to the University of Wyoming to serve as a stock farm and experiment station. During this time, the interior of the stone prison structure was changed, with brick cells being removed to make room for structures that would soon house animals. At points, construction stopped on buildings for animals due to the lack of funds, which was remedied by selling materials from the former cells.

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Aerial view showing Wyoming Territorial Prison, ca. 1925. Photo taken by Ludwig Photography Studio, which still operates in Laramie, Wyoming. UW American Heritage Center photo files.  

For nearly nine decades, the Territorial Prison site served as the University’s stock farm. When the University left the property in the late 1980s, other groups took up the charge of caring for the prison grounds, not only restoring it to the bygone era when it served as a prison, but adding and interpreting the property into a historic site and museum. The Wyoming Territorial Prison now stands as a living testament to Laramie’s early days while also being listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Sheep herd with Wyoming Territorial Prison in background, undated photo. UW American Heritage Center photo files. 

The AHC holds many collections that depict the various stages of the prison’s history. Over the next two weeks, two collections will highlight some of these stages through a variety of documents. These two collections are the T.A. Larson papers (Coll. 400029) and the Gladys B. Beery papers (Coll. 12556).

T.A. Larson was a professor of history at UW for many years, publishing many books on the topic of Wyoming history. The collection contains subject files, manuscripts, and notes from his books as well as his materials from teaching Wyoming history.

Gladys Beery was a Laramie, Wyoming, author and historian. Known for her writing on historic homes in Laramie, her collection contains her research files for her books and newspaper column on various points of Laramie History.

The Wyoming Territorial Prison exhibit will run from May 29 to June 11. The American Heritage Center is closed to observe Memorial Day on May 28. The exhibit can be viewed in the 4th floor Reading Room of the AHC. Reading Room hours are 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM on Monday and 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Tuesday through Friday. Closed Saturday and Sunday.

For more details about Laramie’s 150th anniversary celebration, see http://visitlaramie.org/laramie150. Celebratory events are planned all summer and into the fall.

Laramie's 150th

– Post submitted by Katey Parris, AHC Reference Department.

Posted in architectural history, Current events, events, exhibits, found in the archive, Laramie 150th Anniversary, Livestock industry, Local history, Outlaws--West (U.S.), Uncategorized, University of Wyoming history, Western history, Wyoming history | Tagged | Leave a comment

Nguyen Cao Ky Papers and the Vietnam War

Primary sources are incredibly valuable to historians studying specific topics.

Those who would like to understand the myriad of perspectives from the Vietnam War may wish to turn their gaze to the American Heritage Center.

Nguyen Cao Ky was the Prime Minister of Southern Vietnam in the 1960s; a sizeable portion of his correspondence, interviews, articles, and speech transcriptions are at the AHC.

ky1

Nguyen Cao Ky (center) wearing a contrasting suit, undated. Box 3, Nguyen Cao Ky Papers, American Heritage Center.

On paper and in speeches, Ky comes off as a highly intellectual, articulate, reserved man fighting on behalf of the anti-communists.

However, Ky’s reputation concerned the Americans that backed him. His reckless behavior, such as not abiding by uniform codes and threatening to kill subversives, created concern among his allies.

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Ky with U.S. President Richard Nixon (left), undated. Box 3, Nguyen Cao Ky Papers, American Heritage Center.

Yet his insights, in hindsight, are invaluable. He believed the war was a result of the Vietnamese drive for independence, coupled with the divisiveness of the Geneva Agreement.

Ky’s testimonies give us valuable information about the Vietnamese perspective, including why Ky thought the war started and the preventative and offensive measures Southern Vietnam needed to take.

Discover this key player’s documents at the AHC for yourself.

– Post submitted by Alex Vernon, American Heritage Center assistant

Posted in International Collections, International relations, military history, oral histories, Politics, Uncategorized, Vietnam War | Tagged | Leave a comment