Once A Cowboy, Always A Cowboy: The History of Homecoming at the University of Wyoming

The updated history of UW Homecoming blog has been recently republished.

two people on a parade float that reads "Once a Cowboy, Always a Cowboy"
Homecoming Parade, 2015. UW Photo.
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Former Members of Congress to visit UW

The American Heritage Center is hosting two former Members of Congress as part of the Congress to Campus program. The program allows college students throughout the U.S. to interact with former Members of Congress by sending bipartisan pairs of former Members of Congress to college campuses. The former Members provide insights into the realities of American democracy by sharing their experiences of both achievement and occasional frustration and bring to life for students the theory and the practice of democracy. The former Members also deliver an important message about bipartisan cooperation.

overhead shot of chairs parliamentary style

Scott Klug (R-Madison, WI) and Dr. Brian Baird (D-WA-3) will on the UW campus September 16 and 17 visiting classes across academic disciplines. They will also interact with students from the UW Lab School and Laramie County Community College (Albany Co. campus).

head shot portrait of a man
Scott Klug. Photo provided.

Scott Klug

Mr. Klug served in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Wisconsin’s 2nd congressional district in Madison, from 1991 until 1999. Rep. Klug was a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. He developed expertise in health care, insurance, financial services, telecommunications and energy policy.

Additionally, Mr. Klug is an Emmy-award winning television journalist, serving as anchor and reporter for various stations in Seattle, Madison, and Washington, DC. Also, in 2013, he authored The Alliance, a mystery novel about religion and antiquities.

head shot portrait of a man
Brain Baird. Photo provided.

Brian Baird

Dr. Baird served in the U.S. House, representing Washington’s 3rd congressional district from 1999 until 2011. He chaired the Science and Technology subcommittees on Energy and the Environment, and the Research, Technology and Education subcommittee. He also served on the House Budget; Transportation and Infrastructure; and Small Business Committees. He was the primary of the STOCK Act and of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act.

He is a member of the ReFormers Caucus of Issue One, which is an American nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that seeks to reduce the role of money in politics.

Dr. Baird is a UW alum. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Wyoming and practiced clinically for twenty years.

Scott Klug and Brian Baird will join U.S. Senator Alan K. Simpson (Wyoming; retired) in a public event to discuss the topic, “The Constitution, Congress and the Presidency: What are the Limits of Power?” Please join us in the AHC’s Stock Growers room at 3:45pm on September 17th to be part of the discussion.


Blog contribution by Leslie Waggener, Archivist, Arrangement and Description

#AlwaysArchiving

Posted in Alan K. Simpson Institute for Western Politics and Leadership, announcements, events, Politics, University of Wyoming | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archives Rewind Vol. 7

August is almost over and the start of the fall semester is about to get underway once again. Before all of that gets going, let’s take a step back and enjoy some more highlights from our “Archives on the Air” series.

black and white image of old reel to reel player with "Archives on the Air" text on top.

Let’s rewind Volume 7…

Episode 145 – Looney Tunes – Michael Maltese Papers

Charlie Chaplin and Yosemite Sam had one thing in common: a mustache.

black and white cartoon story board featuring Quick Draw McGraw
Storyboard drawn by Michael Maltese for Quick Draw McGraw: Gun Shy Girl, undated. Box 1, Michael Maltese papers.

Episode 58 – Win a Trip to the Chicago World’s Fair – Montgomery Wards Records

Last week we honored Montgomery Wards because it marked the anniversary of the production of the very first Montgmery Ward catalog. Back in 1933 they gave out 200 trips to children to visit the World’s Fair. The trick was convincing other folks to order products from them.

group of kids sitting and standing posing for a photo with a banner
The Denver district winners of the Montgomery Ward World’s Fair trip contest, 1933. Box 44, Montgomery Ward records.

Episode 45 – Predock’s Centennial Complex – University of Wyoming Communication Records

As you drive into Laramie from the east, you can see the beautiful Centennial Complex — it’s where our offices and archives reside, along with artwork from all over the world. Did you know we almost had a completely different building design?

architectural drawing of inside of building
Early sketch of interior, forest area (now the Loggia) of the American Heritage Center, Centennial Complex, undated. AHC Photo Files.

Episode 40 – Wyoming Boy Makes It Big In Hollywood – Wally Wales Papers

Once a cowboy, always a cowboy is a motto we often use at the University of Wyoming. However, there’s a difference between ‘film cowboys’ and ‘real cowboys.’

But what happens when you’re someone like Wally Wales and you’re both?

man sitting on ground outside with calf roped, horse, campfire and lots of cattle behind them.
Wales and his horse sitting on the range, undated. Box 1, Wally Wales Papers.

The purpose of the Archives Rewind series is to highlight episodes from our “Archives on the Air” segment that airs on Wyoming Public Media.

“Archives on the Air” can be heard on Wyoming Public Radio Monday through Friday at 11:50 am, and 6:50 pm or online on Wyoming Public Media’s website.

Posted in Archives on the Air, cartoons, Local history, Montgomery Ward, Motion picture actors and actresses, motion picture history, University of Wyoming, University of Wyoming history, Western history, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Back to the Future in Wyoming: Addressing 1980s Energy Boom Impacts in Evanston

“I’ve got to see it to believe it” was Evanston mayor Dennis Ottley’s first reaction when he heard about the Overthrust Industrial Association (OIA). A 1983 issue of the Christian Science Monitor, reported that Ottley was incredulous that an industry-backed organization would assist his southwestern Wyoming town through the growing pains of an energy boom. “I made that statement, but I ate them words,” said Ottley, adding, “I think we proved to the world that industry and local government can work together.”

The Overthrust Industrial Association (OIA) was an organization of 36 oil and gas producers and service/supply firms founded in 1980 by Chevron, Amoco, and Champlin. The OIA’s mission was to help local governments in southwestern Wyoming, northeastern Utah, and southeastern Idaho manage socioeconomic and environmental impacts caused by the rapid development of oil and gas resources in the energy-rich geological formation known as the Overthrust Belt.

There was certainly an overflow of issues for the energy companies and Evanston to tackle. Schools were packed to the rafters; oil field workers were living in their cars; construction workers had set up “bachelor camps” on the edge of town; and crime rates soared. According to a Winter 1981 article in the magazine Wyoming Issues, Evanston had grown from a population of 4,862 in 1977 to 7000+ in 1981.

image with text; number projections
Employee projections for 1981 and 1982 contained in report issued by the Lincoln-Uinta Association of Governments. Overthrust Industrial Association records, Box 1, Folder 2.

The first step by the industry-community partnership of OIA was a series of meetings, beginning in February 1981, where Evanston residents could air their grievances. Next came the establishment of a committee to present community requests to the OIA, which, as of 1983, provided about $100 million for schools, roads, water lines, sewers, and other projects.

The Monitor’s article quotes Evanston city administrators regarding the OIA. City administrator Stephen Snyder explained to the Monitor that the OIA was pushed into existence partly because of pressure from county government, which had the power to deny the building permits the companies sought. According to Mayor Ottley, by the time the OIA was launched, the people of Evanston had long been in the dark as to how big a boom to expect. “The energy companies weren’t telling us much,” Ottley said.

“But the OIA has been very good,” Julie Lehman, director of the city housing authority, told the Monitor. ”And if it never did anything but facilitate communications between industry and governmental entities, it would be worth it.”

The Monitor was somewhat patronizing in concluding, “Evanston may not be your candidate for city beautiful, but Chuck McLean of the Denver Research Group gives the city high marks for the way it has coped.”  

Besides passing out funds, the OIA retained a consulting firm, the Denver Research Group, to develop a comprehensive plan for streets, utilities, and so on, and to help the city lobby for grant money from other sources. Out of these efforts came the seed of the Evanston Renewal Ball, which still exists and has grown from a community celebration involving a handful of volunteers to a major fundraising event. The primary purpose of the Ball has become the preservation and revitalization of the downtown and the rail yards.

image with text - memo from Denver Research Group, Inc.
The Denver Research Group closely monitored media coverage for industry partners in the OIA, Overthrust Industrial Association records, Box 11, Folder 5.

As the energy boom subsided in the mid-1980s, so did the OIA. By 1984, the OIA was publishing its last issues of Overthrust News. By 1985, an energy bust had already engulfed Wyoming.

The OIA records at the UW American Heritage Center contain administrative files beginning with the development of the OIA concept in 1979 and ending with the practical shutdown of the organization in 1985. Files document interaction with local government agencies and oil and gas corporations and describe the assistance provided to impacted communities. Original order has been maintained and a printed guide to the files, written by the organization, is included.


Blog contribution by Leslie Waggener, Archivist, Arrangement and Description

#AlwaysArchiving

Posted in Economic Geology, Economic History, energy resources, Local history, Natural resources, Western history, western politics and leadership, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Finding Aids: August 2019

We’ve had a busy and productive summer processing collections! Here’s another round of finding aids we’ve published so you can see what we’ve been up to.

As a reminder, Finding Aids act as a table of contents for our collections. These aids help you find information about specific collections we have, and the information contained in the collections. We create these aids so it’s easier for researchers to figure out if collection is relevant to their work.

The strengths of our collections include Wyoming and the American West, politics and public policy, ranching and energy, entertainment and popular culture, industry, transportation, and military history. The documents and archives we hold serve as raw data for scholarship and heritage work, and support thriving communities of place, identity, and interest in Wyoming and beyond.

black and white image; one person smiling in hall of archives shelves. person holding collection

Finding Aid Updates (from collections processed 6/9/19 – 7/10/19)


Wyoming attorney and judge John R. Arnold. Arnold was a county officer in Uinta County in the 1890s.

Petroleum industry historian James P. Martin. Martin compiled information about Standard Oil and the Rockefeller family.

Richard S. Putney oral history. Putney was a minister with the University of Wyoming campus ministry in the 1960s and 1970s.

Edwin M. Binder photo album. Binder’s service as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force in Germany in the 1960s is documented.

Bennett Hammer LGBT clippings collection. From 1970-2009 Hammer collected articles on LGBT-related issues to preserve the dominant discourse in United States culture.

Montana-Yellowstone Oil Company. The company brought the first rotary drill to Cedar Creek Oil Field (Mont.) in 1917.

University of Wyoming Outreach School. The Outreach School was incorporated into the Office of Distance Education Support in 2017.

Wyoming Quilt Project. The project aimed to document quilt-making and its history in the state.

Jean Howard was a Hollywood actress, hostess, celebrity, and photographer. University of Wyoming, American Heritage Center (AHC) has digitized and made accessible online 1500 negatives from the Jean Howard papers #10714. Her book, Jean Howard’s Hollywood: A Photo Memoir (1989), depicts the time of the Palm Springs movie colony and studio rule. She was born Ernestine Hill on October 13, 1919 in Longview, Texas. Her father financed her participation in fashion shows and beauty contests. She signed a contract with MGM, but went to New York with Lorenz Ziegfeld instead. She was in the 1930s Ziegfeld Follies and later in a number of films including The Prize Fighter and The Lady. Louis B. Mayer fell in love with her and proposed marriage, but she rejected him and married Charles Feldman (agent-producer) instead. They divorced in 1948, but continued to share their intimate and professional life until his death in 1968. In 1964, she met musician Tony Santoro in a Capri nightclub. They lived together and migrated between Capri, Italy and California until they eventually married and settled in California in 1973. After their divorce, Howard spent more of her time in Italy, but returned to California during her last years. She died at home in 2000. Jean Howard’s interest in photography began during the 1940s on the advice of a graphologist, who convinced her to take some serious classes (her student work is in the collection). Her ability to capture fellow celebrities at their ease makes her pictures remarkable. They appeared in Life, Vogue, and other major magazines while her fame as a photographer grew. Collection contains biographical material, correspondence, celebrated photographs, subject files, and materials for autobiographical photo books on Hollywood and Cole Porter.


These and other AHC collections can be discovered in the University of Wyoming Libraries catalog. We are open for walk-in research on Mondays 10 am – 7 pm and Tuesdays through Fridays 8 am – 5 pm. For distance research assistance please contact our reference department at ahcref@uwyo.edu or 307-766-3756.

#AlwaysArchiving

Posted in Digital collections, Hollywood history, Laramie, LGBT, LGBTQIA+, Local history, military history, Motion picture actors and actresses, motion picture history, Natural resources, newly digitized collections, newly processed collections, oral histories, Out West in the Rockies, popular culture, University of Wyoming, University of Wyoming history, Western history, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archives Rewind Vol. 6

It’s hard to believe it’s August already. Time flies while we’re busy archiving. It’s that time again — more highlights from rewinding our “Archives on the Air” series.

black and white image of film reel player with "Archives on the Air" text and UW AHC logo

Let’s rewind Volume 6…

Episode 70 – The Flying Nun – The Harry Ackerman Papers

Why was Sally Field was a little embarrassed by the concept of “The Flying Nun”?

image with "The Flying Nun" text and nun flying in sky in background
Title card from The Flying Nun, 1968, from Screen Gems.

Episode 73 – UFO Psychology – Leo Sprinkle Papers

Considering Area 51 is a hot topic as of late, it seemed appropriate to talk about the psychology of UFO conspiracies.

newspaper image with mountain and possible "UFO" in sky
Photograph of a UFO or a natural phenomenon from Dr. Leo Sprinkle’s research files, undated. Box 14, Leo Sprinkle papers.

Episode 68 – Canada Connected Coast to Coast – Burt Buffum Papers

Since the 150th anniversary of the U.S. Transcontinenal Railway happened this summer, it seemed important to point out that there was also a Canadian Pacific Railway.

Map of Canada and northern United States
Early map of the Canadian Pacific Railway, printed on a lantern slide, undated. Box 39, B.C. Buffum Papers.

Episode 43 – Take Me Out To The Ball Game – Joseph C. O’Mahoney Papers

Baseball season is in full swing — but were you ever curious about how “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” came about? Senator Joseph C. O’Mahoney got the answer for us.

men in suits sitting in chairs inside a room
Senator Joseph O’Mahoney (center) interviewing six songwriters about the Jukebox Problem (royalties to writers). Jack Norwood (far right) composed “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”, 1958. Box 386, Joseph C. O’Mahoney papers.

The purpose of the Archives Rewind series is to highlight episodes from our “Archives on the Air” segment that airs on Wyoming Public Media.

“Archives on the Air” can be heard on Wyoming Public Radio Monday through Friday at 8:50 am, 11:50 am, and 6:50 pm or online on Wyoming Public Media’s website.

#AlwaysArchiving

Posted in Archives on the Air, Motion picture actors and actresses, motion picture history, music, Sports and Recreation, television history, western politics and leadership | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Navigating Botany Led by W.G. Solheim I

Wilhelm G. Solheim was born in Stoughton, Wisconsin, in 1898. He earned his M.A. degree in 1926, followed by his Doctorate in 1928, from the University of Illinois. He came to UW that next year and worked as professor emeritus for over fifty years (Laramie Daily Boomerang, 1978). He headed the Botany department and later he became the dean of Arts and Sciences for a year.

He was known “as the foremost authority on the fungi of the Rocky Mountain region” (Laramie Daily Boomerang, 1978). He retired from UW in 1963 where he then traveled to Afghanistan. He passed away on May 18, 1978, just after his eightieth birthday.

newspaper with text -- transcribed in text
University of Wyoming Associated Students. “Solheim to Serve in Afghanistan Program,” Branding Iron (August 9, 1963) Accessed May 14, 2019: hdl.handle.net/10176/wyu:324065.

Transcription of Branding Iron Article:

Solheim to Serve in Afghanistan Program

W. G. Solheim, UW professor, left Laramie Saturday for Afghanistan where he will serve as chief administrator of the UW Afghanistan contract program at Kabul.

The program is being carried out by a 15-member team of professors under a contract between UW and the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID), an agency of the U.S. Department of State. UW has been involved in various phases of the Afghan program over the past 11 years.

Solheim’s appointment became effective Aug. 1, following federal confirmation. His wife will accompany him during the two-year stint.

Enroute to Afghanistan via a western route, Solheim and his wife will stop in Bangkock, Thailand, to visit briefly with their son, W.G. Solheim, II, a 1947 graduate who holds a doctorate in anthropology and who is conducting field research there. They will also spend three days in New Delhi, India, where Solheim will address a meeting of the Indian Phytopathological Society.

Solheim was born in Stoughton, Wis., graduated from Augustana College and Normal School in 1920, received his bachelor’s degree in 1924 from Iowa State Teachers College and his master’s and doctorate degrees from the University of Illionois in 1926 and 1928, respectively.

He has served UW as professor of botany and as acting dean of the college of arts and sciences.

A member of Phi Beta Kappa and numerous other honoraries, including Sigma Xi, Phi Sigma Phi Eta and Kappa Delta Pi, he has also served on the executive committee of the Colorado-Wyoming Academy Research Foundation.

He was a field agent for the U.S. Department of Agriculture during the summers of 1923-25 and taught at North Dakota Agricultural College before joining the UW faculty in 1929.

During World War I he served in Englad and France with the Army and has since traveled extensively in the U.S., Canada and Europe.

Solheim has published actively in the field of botany since 1927 and has conducted numerous research projects including those on vitamins and the growth of fungi in pure culture, the effect of natural gases on the growth of plants and rust fungi of North Dakota. His hobbies include hunting, fishing, photography and stamp collecting.

person sitting at desk; person standing looking at person at desk
University of Wyoming Associated Students. “Wyo Senior class of 1950,” University of Wyoming (1950) Accessed May 14, 2019: hdl.handle.net/10176/wyu:78199.

Some little known facts about W. G. Solheim include that he served in World War I.

He earned an honorary Doctor of Laws Degree in 1978.

man sitting in graduation regalia with diploma and woman looking on
Newspaper photo of W.G. Solheim and his wife. W.G. Solheim I, AHC Bio File, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming

To learn more about W.G. Solheim I and his work in mycology, see the W.G. Solheim I papers at the American Heritage Center.


Blog contribution by MaKayla Garnica, William D. Carlson Endowment Intern

#AlwaysArchiving

Posted in Agricultural history, Agriculture, environmental history, faculty/staff profiles, Interns' projects, Local history, University of Wyoming, University of Wyoming history, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Finding Aids: July 2019

The faculty have been processing collections left and right, so here’s another round of new finding aids we’ve published.

As a reminder, Finding Aids act as a table of contents for our collections. These aids help you find information about specific collections we have, and the information contained in the collections. We create these aids so it’s easier for researchers to figure out if collection is relevant to their work.

The strengths of our collections include Wyoming and the American West, politics and public policy, ranching and energy, entertainment and popular culture, industry, transportation, and military history. The documents and archives we hold serve as raw data for scholarship and heritage work, and support thriving communities of place, identity, and interest in Wyoming and beyond.

black and white image of two people around a table using archives and doing research. AHC logo

Finding Aid Updates (from collections processed 5/24/19 – 6/7/19)


William Field’s Boy Scout photo album. Field’s album shows Scout activities in Wyoming in the 1920s.

William Ward’s Wyoming business signage collection. Casper Neon created business signs in the 1960s and 1970s.

University of Wyoming Botany professor W.G. Solheim. Solheim was the foremost authority of Rocky Mountain fungi.

University of Wyoming English professor Richard F. Fleck. Fleck’s interests included environmentalism and Native American literature.

Ecologist W.H. Romme. Romme is a specialist in the ecological role of fire.

University of Wyoming Dean of Women Margaret Tobin. Tobin’s materials include personal as well as professional papers.

Civil engineer Gayle Lewis. Lewis photographed his work on the Boysen Dam.

Symphony Association for the University of Wyoming. The Association supports the UW Symphony Orchestra.

Geologist Jay Alan Raney. Raney was an exploration geologist for Anaconda in the western United States.

Homesteaders Loran and Ruth Otto. The family moved to the Heart Mountain area in 1948.

NRA field representative Alan S. Krug. Krug was a long-time advocate for gun rights.

Wamsutter Community Development Project. The Wamsutter project aimed to mitigate rapid growth in a small Wyoming community.

Ethyl Corporation motion picture films (Records #00548). The Ethyl Corporation, chartered in Delaware in 1924, originated from the research efforts of scientists and chemical engineers Charles F. Kettering and Thomas Midgeley, Jr. In 1921, Midgley and Kettering discovered tetraethyl lead as an anti-knock agent in automobile engines. Kettering named this tetraethyl lead “Ethyl” gasoline and made it available to the public in 1923. Midgley and Kettering founded the General Motors Chemical Company to provide distribution of the gasoline. Standard Oil Company of New Jersey joined General Motors Chemical in its manufacturing to create Ethyl Corporation in 1924. Collection includes account books, stock certificates, newspapers and maps, advertisements, and other materials gathered by Boudreau and deal mostly with the petroleum industry in Pennsylvania (1823-1960). Also included is Thomas Midgley’s correspondence (1919-1952) regarding scientific research and business matters; photographs and glass slides of research and equipment (1923-1943); publications and speeches (1923-1983); service and training films; and audio of a 1940 Charles Kettering speech and a 20th anniversary observation. The motion pictures of this collection are digitized and available online.

Wendell C. White collection of Sinclair Oil Corporation films #12704. Wendell C. White started employment with Sinclair Oil Company in 1964 as a City Salesman in Salt Lake City. His next assignment was as Sales Representative – General in a move that took him to Boise, Idaho, in 1965. His next assignment in 1968 took him to Denver, Colorado, to manage Sinclair’s Dealer Training Program. With “stock tender offers” Atlantic Richfield acquired Sinclair in 1969. White became the Human Resources Representative with ARCO and subsequently Human Resources Manager with Pasco, Inc. and finally Human Resources Director with the Holding Family expansion of Sinclair Oil, Sun Valley, ranch and hospitality operations for 24 years. White retired in 2000 completing 36 years of Sinclair service. He continued to serve as Sinclair Historian – Retired. Collection contains digital copies of marketing, promotional, and training films of Sinclair Oil Corporation which was formed in 1916 by Harry F. Sinclair. In 1969, Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) acquired Sinclair, and it became one of the United States’ largest privately owned companies, owning and operating refineries, gas stations, hotels, two ski resorts, and a cattle ranch. The films of this collection are digitized and available online.


These and other AHC collections can be discovered in the University of Wyoming Libraries catalog. We are open for walk-in research on Mondays 10 am – 7 pm and Tuesdays through Fridays 8 am – 5 pm. For distance research assistance please contact our reference department at ahcref@uwyo.edu or 307-766-3756.

#AlwaysArchiving

Posted in Archival Film, Digital collections, energy resources, environmental history, Finding Aids, Heart Mountain, newly digitized collections, newly processed collections, University of Wyoming, University of Wyoming history, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Folklife in Wyoming

Folklife is a complex, important and large component of culture. It encompasses the art, traditions and knowledge that passes down among a group of people and can be seen through dance, music, artwork, storytelling, ceremonies and belief sharing. While sometimes thought of as something “old” or “old-fashioned,” folklife is instead fluid and changes as the community changes. The elements of folklife – doing, making, believing, speaking and teaching – create a shared sense of identity by connecting people to the past through actions of the present.

wooden box full of decorated eggs
Lisa McDonald, Ukrainian egg decorating

The Wyoming Folklife Archive collection at the American Heritage Center (AHC) documents the activities, artworks and traditions of the many diverse groups in the state. Within the collection you’ll find examples of folklife from Basque, cowboy, Eastern European, Hispanic and Shoshoni communities, among many others. Some elements of dances and craftwork might be familiar, while other elements of cuisine and architecture are new. They all nevertheless represent the widespread uniqueness of Wyoming’s many communities.

decorate origami on a stand on a table
Rose Aguilar, Gillette, Okinawan painter and Origami maker

In 2015, an exhibit, The Art of the Hunt: Wyoming Traditions, was shown at the Wyoming State Museum in Cheyenne. It was a collaborative project between the Wyoming Arts Council and the University of Wyoming’s American Studies Program that explored the deep-rooted traditions, stories and skills Wyomingites have that connect them to hunting. Hunting involves more than the pursuit of animals. It can be stories of previous hunts, sharing of knowledge about how to track, strategies, and migratory patterns, as well as the creation of tools used in the pursuit.

The 5-year-long collection of research behind the exhibit is housed at the AHC. Within it contains photos of and interviews with over 100 people involved in Wyoming’s art of the hunt, such as saddle makers, fly fishers, knife makers, ranchers and taxidermists.

In addition to The Art of the Hunt: Wyoming Traditions materials in the Wyoming Folklife Archives collection, you can see photos of blacksmithing, leather working, jewelry-making, painting, woodcarving, ropemaking and more.

wood carving of grass, tree, and barn
Larry Simmons, Glenrock, Woodcarver

You can also listen to song recordings and both audio and video interviews of fly tiers, knifemakers, spinners, weavers, poets, and songwriters.

The Wyoming Folklife Archive collection at the AHC was created by the folklife coordinators and specialists at the University of Wyoming’s American Studies program and builds on the work of the State of Wyoming’s Council of Arts. Today new records showing Wyoming folklife are collected through the combined efforts of the UW American Studies program, the Wyoming Arts Council and the Wyoming Humanities Council.

To learn more about Wyoming folklife, see the Wyoming Folklife Archive papers at the American Heritage Center.

Blog contribution by Rachel Gattermeyer, Digital Archivist, Reference Services

#AlwaysArchiving

Posted in Local history, oral histories, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archives Rewind Vol. 5

Welcome back! It’s that time again — more highlights from rewinding our “Archives on the Air” series.

black and white image with yellow text. image is of old TV, VHS tapes, records, and music amplifiers.

Let’s get Volume 5 on rewind…

Episode 163 – Wyoming Defends Woman’s Suffrage – Morton E. Post Famly Papers 

Women’s Suffrage has been a hot topic as of late, particularly in Wyoming. You see, we’re celebrating 150 years of women voting here — 50 years before the 19th Amendment.

Also relevant — check out this recent article in the Smithsonian Magazine about how Wyoming is celebrating this anniversary.

hallway with shelves full of boxes on both sides

Boxes filled with archival collection material in one of the storage rooms at the American Heritage Center. Photo by Rick Walters.


Episode 72 – The Early Byrd – First African American in Wyoming State Senate

Speaking of women and politics — Harriett Elizabeth Byrd was the first African American legislator in Wyoming. She served in the Wyoming House for 8 years, and Wyoming Senate for 4 years. She was the primary sponsor for legislation that created Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Wyoming.

byrd

Harriet Elizabeth Byrd and her husband James W. Byrd (the first African American chief of police in WY.), Various dates. Box 10, Harriet Elizabeth Byrd Family papers.


Episode 153 – Escape from Bolivia – Gale McGee Papers

And yet another politician from Wyoming — Gale McGee, who served as a U.S. Senator from 1959-77 — found himself in the middle of a coup in Bolivia in 1979.

From perspective of sitting in back seat of a car. Two people in front seat; can see one person in rear view mirror. In the street are a car and a military tank. There are several brick buildings on the right side of the street.

The scene as viewed from the backseat of the McGees’ vehicle, October 1979. Box 25A, Gale McGee papers.


Episode 64 – Communists In Your Neighborhood: Sesame Street’s Mr. Hooper & The Red Scare

Before staring as grocer Mr. Hooper in Sesame Street, Will Lee was blacklisted from acted because he was suspected of being a communist during the McCarthyism era.

man standing behind table/bar inside and holding a glass and towel.

Will Lee as Mr. Hooper on the set of Sesame Street, 1970s. Box 1, Will Lee papers.

 


The purpose of the Archives Rewind series is to highlight episodes from our “Archives on the Air” segment that airs on Wyoming Public Media.

“Archives on the Air” can be heard on Wyoming Public Radio Monday through Friday at 8:50 am, 11:50 am, and 6:50 pm or online on Wyoming Public Media’s website.

#AlwaysArchiving

 

Posted in African American history, Archives on the Air, Blacklisting, Bolivian history, Communism, Gale McGee, Local history, Martin Luther King Jr., Motion picture actors and actresses, Politics, Suffrage -- United States, Women -- suffrage, women's history, Wyoming, Wyoming history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment